Undergraduate Project Symposium 2017-10-18T11:59:47+00:00
Symposium

 

The Undergraduate Project Symposium is an annual event highlighting the research, scholarly and artistic works of undergraduate students at the University of Saskatchewan.

From research posters to sculptures, presentations to musical numbers, community engaged learning experiences to dramatic dialogues. Any type of work may be submitted!

Submission deadline December 15, 2017.

Submit your project proposal here 

2017 USSU Undergraduate Project Symposium Results

People’s Choice Award

Mackenzie Moleski; Helen Tang

Bridging the Educational Gap through Kiskiaumatowin

Kiskiaumatowin is a Cree word describing a type of learning where teacher and student are learning from one another in an interactional way. The Science Ambassador Program at the University of Saskatchewan places senior university science students in northern Aboriginal communities where they deliver hands-on science activities that are meaningful and culturally relevant based on interactions with students and the community. These activities and the presence of Science Ambassadors in the community intend to bridge the gap in educational attainment in northern Indigenous communities and engage youth so that they may pursue post-secondary education. Science Ambassadors also benefit through Kiskiaumatowin by experiencing living and working in a northern community and gaining greater cultural awareness that they can share in their future studies and as part of the greater university community.

Signature Research Area Award ($300 prize)

Courtney Onstad

Preliminary geochemical analysis of host rock lithologies at the Arrow uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin, Saskatchewan: Interpretation of protolith and alteration

The objective of this project is to analyze the mineralogical, textural and geochemical components of samples from the Arrow deposit to classify and determine the similar texture from unaltered and slightly altered samples of the major host rocks. Samples from drill core were collected based on similar texture from unaltered and slightly altered samples of the major host rocks. This project will include a comparison of the trace elements as well as thin section/hand sample descriptions from selected samples.

Sciences & Engineering Placement Prizes

First Place (Tie for First – $500 prize each)

Courtney Onstad

Preliminary geochemical analysis of host rock lithologies at the Arrow uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin, Saskatchewan: Interpretation of protolith and alteration

The objective of this project is to analyze the mineralogical, textural and geochemical components of samples from the Arrow deposit to classify and determine the similar texture from unaltered and slightly altered samples of the major host rocks. Samples from drill core were collected based on similar texture from unaltered and slightly altered samples of the major host rocks. This project will include a comparison of the trace elements as well as thin section/hand sample descriptions from selected samples.

 

Abhishek Kumar; Wyatt Cowell

Using one or two arms to add haptic input during walking: Does it matter?

Injuries from falls are a major public health concern in Canada, and walking balance plays a major role in preventing falls. Adding haptic feedback from the hands has been shown to improve walking balance. There are two major ways to add haptic input to improve walking balance: rigid-railing and non-rigid anchors. In this study, we compared the use of these two different tools, with respect to the number of arms used and the effect on added sensory input on walking in young healthy adults. Inertial-based sensors were used to collect kinematic data during walking while using one or two arms for each tool and also while pretending to use each tool (placebo trials). Results will provide a clearer picture in how the sensory feedback from hands play a role in improving walking balance, and would pave the road towards research in using these tools as a treatment option in physically impaired individuals.

Third Place

Damon Zwarich; Matthew Chapelski; Sara Mulenga-Woo

Effects of Haptic Feedback on Gait Parameters During Nodding Pole Walking

Sensory feedback such as touch (haptic input) can provide improved proprioceptive knowledge during walking. We aimed to test this using Nordic Pole walking, measuring gait parameters, which has not been previously investigated.

  • 16 young healthy adults tested (age: 22.6 ±  3.6 years, height: 173.0 ± 9.3 cm, 76.3 ± 25.8 kg, 8 female)
  • Prior to collection, an instructional video on Nordic pole walking was shown and 10 minutes of practice provided  
  • Participants then walked along a 20 m straight hallway in each of three conditions (Fig 1):

Normal walking (Walk)

Standard walking with Nordic poles (Activator, Urban Poling, BC) (Nordic)

Walking with shortened Nordic poles that did not touch the ground (No Haptic)

  • For the No Haptic condition, participants moved their arms similar to the Nordic condition
  • Six trials collected per condition with condition order counterbalanced between participants

Social Sciences, Humanities & Fine Arts Placement Prizes

First Place ($500 prize)

Michael Lewis; Mikayla Coad; Jenny Panchuk

How Methods for Manufacturing Pottery Affect Contamination on Surfaces of Pottery Sherds from Tel Dor and Tel Beth-Shemesh, Israel

Processes used to manufacture pottery affect the degree of contamination with sediment. Here we investigated how the degree of sediment contamination of pottery sherds varies as a function of manufacturing techniques. Five techniques including slipping, burnishing, painting, combing, and uncoated were compared. Sherds of pottery came from two different archaeological sites in the Near East; Tel Dor and Tel Beth-Shemesh, Israel: Each of these sherds were chosen to represent a different method of manufacturing pottery. Elemental analysies were conducted by use of a combination of powder X-ray diffraction, Attenuated Total Internal Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Associations between magnitude of contamination with soil were observed among methods of manufacture.

Second Place ($400 prize)

Kathryn Bloski; Rachel Cooper; Melissa Shaw; Benjamin Kmiech

Loose Change: Analyzing Roman Republic Denarii using XRF

The significance of ancient coins as valuable pieces of archaeology and their vital role in history are well-acknowledged.  By combining the base level study of coins with XRF analysis from the Canadian Light Source and a benchtop XRF instrument we can investigate the elemental composition of three coins from the Roman Republic period between 157 – 110 BCE. Through this data along with research into the historical background of this time period we will be able to explore the purity of the metal, possible locations that would supply the raw material, and the success of ancient refinement. This information can contribute to the greater scope of Ancient Roman history that will enable further knowledge of Roman use of foreign mines, along with the usage of specific mines and their fluctuation during different years. XRF analysis allows us to take a closer look into the composition of the silver denarii in a non-destructive manner that preserves the artifact for future generations to admire and work with.

Third Place ($300 prize)

Mackenzie Moleski; Helen Tang

Bridging the Educational Gap through Kiskiaumatowin

Kiskiaumatowin is a Cree word describing a type of learning where teacher and student are learning from one another in an interactional way. The Science Ambassador Program at the University of Saskatchewan places senior university science students in northern Aboriginal communities where they deliver hands-on science activities that are meaningful and culturally relevant based on interactions with students and the community. These activities and the presence of Science Ambassadors in the community intend to bridge the gap in educational attainment in northern Indigenous communities and engage youth so that they may pursue post-secondary education. Science Ambassadors also benefit through Kiskiaumatowin by experiencing living and working in a northern community and gaining greater cultural awareness that they can share in their future studies and as part of the greater university community.